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Strato II

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Subject: History of Pakistan, Bactria, Menander I, Mathura, Indo-Greeks, Eucratides I, Indo-Scythians, Soter, Straton, Rajuvula
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Strato II

This article is about Indo-Greek kings. For the airplane, see Grob Strato 2C.
Strato II
Indo-Greek king
Kharoshthi legend: MAHARAJASA TRATARASA STRATASA "King Strato the Saviour".
Reign 25 BCE – 10 CE

Strato II "Soter" was an Indo-Greek king. He ruled circa 25 BCE to 10 CE according to Bopearachchi. R. C. Senior suggests that his reign ended perhaps a decade earlier.

Rule

Strato II ruled in the eastern Punjab, probably retaining the capital of Sagala (modern Sialkot, Pakistan), or possibly to the city of Bucephala (Plutarch, p. 48 n. 5).

His territory was invaded by Rajuvula, Indo-Scythian king of Mathura, and he became the last of the Indo-Greek kings, together with his son[1] Strato (III) Soter Philopator, who was included as joint regent on some of his coins and also issued coins on his own.

A few silver coins with a different portrait and the inscription Strato Soter Dikaios may also belong to Strato III as sole ruler, or to a fourth king named Strato.[2] (Given that the coins of Strato I have lately been attributed to two different kings, there may actually have been as many as five kings named Strato.)

Just like the earlier king Strato I, the last Stratons I are thought to belong to the dynasty of Menander I, who also used the epithet Soter and the symbol of standing Pallas Athena.

Coins of Strato II, III and Strato Dikaios

The chronology of the late Indo-Greek kingdom has been established by Bopearachchi and other scholars from numismatical evidence alone. The coins deteriorated continuously, the Strato coins being the most debased and crude in style, a striking contrast to earlier kings who struck some of the most beautiful coins of antiquity.

The decay was due to the increasing pressure of the Indo-Scythian nomads on the remaining Greek pockets, as well as their long isolation from the rest of the Hellenistic world.Subsequent Indo-Scythian rulers, such as Bhadayasa designed their coins in direct imitation of those of Strato II.

Strato II, III and Strato Dikaios struck debased silver drachms, which as mentioned portray Pallas on the reverse. Strato II appears as an old man with a sunken jaw on some of his coins, which is not surprising given that his grandson was co-regent.

Strato II also issued bronzes and even lead coins of the common type Apollo/tripod. On some of Strato II's silver drachms the letter sigma is written as C, a not uncommon trait on late Hellenistic coins in the east.

INDO-GREEK KINGS AND THEIR TERRITORIES
Based on Bopearachchi (1991)
Territories/
Dates
PAROPAMISADE
ARACHOSIA GANDHARA WESTERN PUNJAB EASTERN PUNJAB
200–190 BCE
190–180 BCE 50px
185–170 BCE
180–160 BCE
175–170 BCE
170–145 BCE
160–155 BCE
155–130 BCE
130–120 BCE 50px
120–110 BCE 50px 50px
110–100 BCE
100 BCE 50px
100–95 BCE Philoxenus
95–90 BCE Diomedes
90 BCE 50px Thraso
90–85 BCE
90–70 BCE 50px
Yuezhi tribes Maues (Indo-Scythian)
75–70 BCE
65–55 BCE Dionysios
55–35 BCE Azes I (Indo-Scythian)
55–35 BCE 50px
25 BCE – 10 CE Strato II & III
Rajuvula (Indo-Scythian)

See also

Notes

Preceded by
Apollophanes
Indo-Greek ruler
(Eastern Punjab)

25 BCE – 10 CE
Office abolished
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