Sunset (color)

Sunset
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FAD6A5
sRGBB  (rgb) (250, 214, 165)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 14, 34, 2)
HSV       (h, s, v) (35°, 34%, 98[1]%)
Source ISCC NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color sunset.

The color sunset is a pale tint of orange. It is a representation of the average color of clouds when the sunlight from a sunset is reflected off of them.

The first recorded use of sunset as a color name in English was in 1916.[2]


Variations of sunset

Sunglow

Sunglow
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FFCC33
sRGBB  (rgb) (255, 204, 51)
HSV       (h, s, v) (50°, 99%, 98%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color sunglow is displayed at right.

The first recorded use of sunglow as a color name in English was in 1924.[3] The Crayola crayon color was formulated in 1990.

Sunray

Sunray
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #E3A857
sRGBB  (rgb) (227, 168, 87)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 26, 62, 11)
HSV       (h, s, v) (35°, 62%, 89[4]%)
Source ISCC NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

At right is displayed the color sunray.

The first recorded use of sunray as a color name in English was in 1926.[5]


Sunset orange

Sunset Orange
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FD5E53
sRGBB  (rgb) (253, 94, 83)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 63, 67, 1)
HSV       (h, s, v) (4°, 67%, 99[6]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color sunset orange is displayed at left.

Sunset orange was formulated as a Crayola color in 1998.


Sun colors in human culture

Interior Design

  • Sunset is popular color in interior design which is used when a pale warm tint is desired.

Music

  • In the lyrics of the 1989 song Keep on Moving by Soul II Soul is the hauntingly immortal line yellow is the color of sun rays.[7]

References

See also

  • List of colors
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