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The Bookseller

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The Bookseller

The Bookseller
Editor Philip Jones
Former editors Nicholas Clee, Louis Baum, Neill Denny
Categories Publishing, Bookselling
Frequency weekly
First issue 1858
Company Bookseller Media Ltd
Based in London
Language English
Website TheBookseller.com

The Bookseller is a Horace Bent, and had been administered in recent years by the former deputy editor, Joel Rickett, and former charts editor, Philip Stone. We Love This Book is its quarterly sister consumer website and email newsletter.

The subscription-only magazine is read by around 30,000 persons each week, in over 90 countries, and contains the latest news from the publishing and bookselling worlds, in-depth analysis, pre-publication book previews and author interviews. It is the first publication to publish official weekly bestseller lists in the UK. It has also created the first UK-based e-book sales ranking. The website is visited by 160,000 unique users each month.

The magazine also produces approximately a dozen specials on an annual basis including its Books of The Year and four "Buyers Guides". The Bookseller also publishes three daily newspapers at the annual London Book Fair, in April, the Bologna Children's Book Fair and the Frankfurt Book Fair, in October.

History

The Bookseller was founded by World War I severely disrupted publication and it was not until the late 1920s that the magazine resumed its weekly schedule. In 1928, The Bookseller entered troublesome years, with the magazine entering joint editorial control between both The Publishers Association and the Booksellers Association. It was edited by the Publishers Association president Geoffrey S Williams and became known as The Publisher and Bookseller. However, the decision proved less than successful, and in 1933 the decision was reversed, with editorship being awarded to Edmond Segrave – 28 years old at the time. He remained in charge for almost 40 years.[2]

In 1945, he hired Philothea Thompson as his personal assistant, and when Edmond Segrave died in 1971, she took over stewardship of the magazine until 1976. David Whitaker joined his family magazine in 1977 for little over two years, with Louis Baum assuming editorial responsibilities in 1980. Under Baum, the magazine went under radical change, with numerous design changes, culminating in the decision to become a full-colour publication in the late 1990s. The self-named "legendary diarist", Horace Bent, made his first appearance during this time (although "his" Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year began in the late 1970s), while the magazine also began to feature the first Nielsen BookScan bestseller lists.[2]

In 1999, Nicholas Clee became editor, months before the magazine was sold to a division of Nielsen Business Media. In 2004 Retail Week's Neill Denny arrived and oversaw another major redesign, which included the controversial decision to move its "Publications of the Week" information online only.

Modern day

Following the demise of Publishing News, The Bookseller is the only paper magazine reporting on the UK publishing, bookselling and library industry on a weekly basis, although the magazine also includes frequent stories, features and columns from the international scene. Numerous famous names from the UK book trade contribute to the magazine via the opinion columns, including Kate Mosse and Anthony Horowitz, while the website provides a forum for anyone to voice their opinions on news and features concerning the trade. In 2010, The Bookseller was acquired from Nielsen by its then Managing Director, Nigel Roby, who owns it to this day.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Philip Jones (2008-11-25). "Profile". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  2. ^ a b Nicholas Clee. 'The Whitaker Years'. The Bookseller, 20 June 2008, pp 34–35.

External links

  • Home page
  • Hathi Trust. The Bookseller (fulltext)
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