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Tooting

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Title: Tooting  
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Subject: Sadiq Khan, Tooting Bec, Mitcham, London, London Buses route 493, London Buses route 44
Collection: Areas of London, Districts of Wandsworth, Major Centres of London, Tooting
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Tooting

Tooting
Tooting is located in Greater London
Tooting
 Tooting shown within Greater London
OS grid reference
London borough Wandsworth
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district SW17 (approx.)
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
EU Parliament London
UK Parliament Tooting
London Assembly Merton and Wandsworth
List of places
UK
England
London

Tooting is a district of South London, England, 5 miles (8 km) south south-west of Charing Cross.[1]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Politics 2
  • Transport 3
    • Nearest railway stations 3.1
  • Open spaces 4
  • Sport 5
  • Markets 6
  • Notable people 7
  • Cultural references 8
  • References 9
  • External links 10

History

Tooting has been settled since pre-Saxon times. The name is of Anglo-Saxon origin but the meaning is disputed. It could mean the people of Tota, in which context Tota may have been a local Anglo-Saxon chieftain.[2] Alternatively it could be derived from an old meaning of the verb to tout, to look out. There may have been a watchtower here on the road to London and hence the people of the look-out post.[2]

The Romans built a road, which was later named Stane Street by the English, from London (Londinium) to Chichester (Noviomagus Regnorum), and which passed through Tooting. Tooting High Street is built on this road. In Saxon times, Tooting and Streatham (then Toting-cum-Stretham) was given to the Abbey of Chertsey. Later, Suene (Sweyn), believed to be a Viking, may have been given all or part of the land. In 933, King Athelstan of England is thought to have confirmed lands including Totinge (Tooting) to Chertsey Abbey.[3]

Tooting appears in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Totinges: Lower Tooting was held from Chertsey Abbey by Haimo the Sheriff (of Kent) when its assets were 1 church, 2½ ploughlands of land and 5 acres (20,000 m2) of meadow. Its people were called to render £4 per year to their overlords. Later in the Norman period, it came into the possession of the De Gravenel family, after whom it was named Tooting Graveney. Until minor changes in the 19th century it consisted of 2 square kilometres (0.77 sq mi).[4]

Upper Tooting, or Tooting Bec (for centuries administered as part of Streatham), appears as a manor held by the Abbey of Hellouin Bec, in Normandy, thus acquiring the "Bec" in its name. Its domesday assets were 5 hides. It had 5½ ploughlands and so was assessed as rendering £7.[5]

As with many of South London's suburbs, Tooting developed during the late Victorian period.[6] Some development occurred in the Edwardian era but another large spurt in growth happened during the 1920s and '30s.

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