World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Treaty of Paris (1259)

The Treaty of Paris (also known as the Treaty of Albeville) was a treaty between Louis IX of France and Henry III of England, agreed to on December 4, 1259 ending 100 years of conflicts between Capetian and Plantagenet dynasties.

In 1204, Philip II of France had forced King John out of continental Normandy enforcing his 1202 claim that the lands were forfeit. Despite the 1217 Treaty of Lambeth, hostilities continued between the successive Kings of France and England until 1259.

Under the Treaty, Henry acknowledged loss of the Dukedom of Normandy. However Philip had failed in his attempts to occupy the Norman islands in the Channel. The treaty held that "islands (if any) which the King of England should hold", he would retain "as peer of France and Duke of Aquitaine" .[1]

Henry agreed to renounce control of Maine, Anjou and Poitou, which had been lost under the reign of King John but remained Duke of Aquitaine and was able to keep the lands of Gascony and parts of Aquitaine but only as a vassal to Louis.

In exchange, Louis withdrew his support for English rebels. He also ceded to Henry the bishoprics and cities of Limoges, Cahors and Périgueux and was to pay an annual rent for possession of Agenais.[2]

Aftermath

Doubts about interpreting the Treaty began almost as soon as it was signed.[3] The agreement resulted in the fact that the English kings had to pay homage liege to the French monarchs for territories on the continent. The situation did not help the friendly relationship between the two states, as it made two sovereigns of equal powers in their countries in fact unequal. According to professor Malcolm Vale, the treaty of Paris was one of the indirect causes of the Hundred Years' War.

See also

References

  1. ^ Summaries of Judgments, Advisory Opinions and Orders of the International Court of Justice: Minquiers and Ecrehos Case Judgment of 17 November 1953
  2. ^ Harry Rothwell (Editor) English Historical Documents 1189-1327, Routledge, 1996, ISBN 0-415-14368-3
  3. ^ p130, Hersch Lauterpacht, Volume 20 of International Law Reports, Cambridge University Press, 1957, ISBN 0-521-46365-3
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World eBook Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.