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Tuscan red

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Title: Tuscan red  
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Subject: Shades of red, Lava (color), PRR 4876, Rust (color), Russet (color)
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Tuscan red

Tuscan Red
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #7C3030
sRGBB  (rgb) (124, 48, 48)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 61, 61, 51)
HSV       (h, s, v) (0°, 61%, 49[1]%)
Source Maerz and Paul[2]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Tuscan red is a shade of red that was used on the passenger cars of the Pennsylvania Railroad, as well as on the PRR TrucTrailers. It also was used extensively by the New South Wales Government Railways in Australia, in a similar fashion to the PRR.[3] The Canadian Pacific Railway used it historically and painted its luxury revival cars in this color.[4] It is also a Prismacolor colored pencil.

Tuscan red was the signature color of the Pennsylvania Railroad [1]

The first recorded use of Tuscan red as a color name in English was in the early 1800s (exact date uncertain).[5]

The color was popular in the late 19th century but non-standardized. It became the ‘signature color’ of the Pennsylvania Railroad, which instituted specifications for its formulation.[6]:36[7] Before the 1880s, pigments extracted from Brazil wood were used in its manufacture, but these proved inadequate in terms of hiding power and stability.[7]

A 1916 US National Bureau of Standards circular describes it as based on Indian red, which derives its color from iron oxides. The color was then modified by treatment with an alizarin lake pigment. The pigment’s stability lent itself to hard use in applications such as rail cars and machinery.[8] Lower-cost imitations were made without iron oxides by using gypsum or whiting as a base and adding aniline dyes.[9]

Contents

  • Variations of Tuscan red 1
    • Tuscan 1.1
    • Tuscany 1.2
    • Tuscan tan 1.3
    • Medium Tuscan red 1.4
    • Tuscan brown 1.5
  • See also 2
  • References 3

Variations of Tuscan red

The traditional color Tuscan red is shown above. The lighter tones of Tuscan red tend toward tan and beige. The darker tones of Tuscan red tend toward purplish tones. These purplish tones of Tuscan red are exemplified by the color deep Tuscan red, shown below.

Tuscan

Tuscan
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #FAD6A5
sRGBB  (rgb) (250, 214, 165)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 14, 31, 2)
HSV       (h, s, v) (35°, 34%, 98[10]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color Tuscan.

The first recorded use of Tuscan as a color name in English was in 1887.[11]


Tuscany

Tuscany
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #C09999
sRGBB  (rgb) (192, 153, 153)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 20, 20, 25)
HSV       (h, s, v) (0°, 20%, 75[12]%)
Source Pantone TPX[13]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

The color Tuscany is displayed at right.

The first recorded use of Tuscany as a color name in English was in 1922.[14]

The source of this color is the "Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX)" color list, color #16-1219 TPX—Tuscany.[15]

Tuscan tan

Tuscan Tan
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #A67B5B
sRGBB  (rgb) (166, 123, 91)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 26, 45, 35)
HSV       (h, s, v) (26°, 45%, 65[16]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Displayed at right is the color Tuscan tan.

The first recorded use of Tuscan tan as a color name in English was in 1926.[17]

Medium Tuscan red

Tuscan Red (ISCC-NBS)
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #79443B
sRGBB  (rgb) (121, 68, 59)
CMYKH   (c, m, y, k) (0, 44, 51, 52)
HSV       (h, s, v) (9°, 51%, 48[18]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
H: Normalized to [0–100] (hundred)

Medium Tuscan red is that tone of Tuscan red that is called Tuscan red in the ISCC-NBS color list.

Tuscan brown

Tuscan Brown
    Color coordinates
Hex triplet #6F4E37
sRGBB  (rgb) (111, 78, 55)
HSV       (h, s, v) (25°, 51%, 44[19]%)
Source ISCC-NBS
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color Tuscan brown.

The first recorded use of Tuscan brown as a color name in English was in 1913.[20]

See also

References

  1. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #7C3030 (Tuscan Red):
  2. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called Tuscan red in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color Tuscan Red is displayed on page 37, Plate 7, Color Sample L8.
  3. ^ John C. Dunn (March 2007). Comeng: A History of Commonwealth Engineering, 1921-1955. Rosenberg Publishing. p. 56.  
  4. ^ Tom Murray (1 July 2006). Canadian Pacific Railway. Voyageur Press. p. 114.  
  5. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscan Red: Page 37 Plate 7 Color Sample L8—The color shown above in the color box at the head of the article matches the color sample in the book.
  6. ^ Schafer, Mike; Welsh, Joe; Holland, Kevin J. (2001). The American Passenger Train. Saint Paul, MN: MBI.  
  7. ^ a b Charles Ludwig Uebele (1913). Paint making and color grinding: a practical treatise for paint manufacturers and factory managers, including comprehensive information regarding factory arrangement; pigments; vehicles and thinners; liquid and cold water paints as well as practical working formulas and recipes. The Painters magazine. pp. 213–218. Retrieved 12 September 2011. 
  8. ^ United States. National Bureau of Standards (1916). Circular of the Bureau of Standards. U.S. Govt. Print. Off. p. 10. Retrieved 12 September 2011. 
  9. ^ Albanis Ashmun Kelly (1920). The expert house painter: A reliable guide for the experienced house painter and manual of instruction for the less expert workman ... Formulas given for various paint mixtures, tests for ascertaining purity and value of materials, how to choose and combine proper colors in their true scientific relations, etc. David McKay company. p. 181. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  10. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #FAD6A5 (Tuscan):
  11. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscan: Page 43 Plate 10 Color Sample E5
  12. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #C09999 (Tuscany):
  13. ^ Type the word "Tuscany" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear.
  14. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscany: Page 37 Plate 10 Color Sample L11
  15. ^ Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder--Type the word "Tuscany" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear:
  16. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #A67B5B (Tuscan Tan):
  17. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscan tan: Page 49 Plate 13 Color Sample C8
  18. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #79443B (Medium Tuscan Red):
  19. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code #79443B (Tuscan Brown):
  20. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 206; Color Sample of Tuscany: Page 37 Plate 7 Color Sample H12
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