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Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia

Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia
Vratislaus I of Bohemia, liber depictus, Český Krumlov, 14th century
Spouse(s) Drahomíra
Noble family Přemyslid dynasty
Father Bořivoj I, Duke of Bohemia
Mother Ludmila of Bohemia
Born c. 888
Died c. 921

Vratislaus (or Wratislaus) I (Czech: Vratislav I.) (c. 888c. 921), a scion of the Czech Přemyslid dynasty, was Duke of Bohemia from 915 until his death.

He was a son of Duke Bořivoj I of Bohemia by his wife Ludmila and the younger brother of Duke Spytihněv I.

By his wife Drahomíra, a Hevellian princess, Vratislaus had at least two sons, Wenceslaus and Boleslaus, both of whom succeeded him as Bohemian dukes. Střezislava, the wife of the Bohemian nobleman Slavník, founder of the Slavník dynasty, is also held to be a daughter of Vratislaus by some historians.

Upon the death of his elder brother Spytihněv in 915, Vratislaus became Bohemian duke at a time when his duchy had already distanced itself from the political and cultural influence of Great Moravia and fallen under East Frankish, especially Bavarian influence. The Annales Fuldenses report that in the year 900 the Bavarians had attacked Moravia in alliance with the Bohemians. On the other hand, Vratislaus supported the Magyars in their 915 campaign against the Duchy of Saxony under Duke Henry the Fowler.

Vratislaus is credited with the establishment of Prague Castle and also with the foundation of the Silesian city of Wrocław (Vratislavia). He died in battle against the Magyars, possibly in 919, although 921 is more often conjectured.

Vratislaus I, Duke of Bohemia
Born: c. 888 Died: c. 921
Preceded by
Spytihněv I
Duke of Bohemia
915 – c. 921
Succeeded by
Wenceslaus I

Sources

  • Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis; Line 244-7
  • The Plantagenet Ancestry by William Henry Turton, Page 85
  • Royal Highness, Ancestry of the Royal Child by Sir Iain Moncreiffe, Pages 64–65


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