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Wheel of Fortune (Tarot card)

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Wheel of Fortune (Tarot card)

Wheel of Fortune (X)

Wheel of Fortune (X) is the tenth trump or Major Arcana card in most Tarot decks. It is used in game playing as well as in divination.

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Interpretation 2
  • Alternative Decks 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Description

To the right is the Wheel Of Fortune card from the A. E. Waite tarot deck. A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of the Tarot in line with the Hermetic magical-religious system which was also being developed at the time,[1] and this deck, as well as being in common use today, also forms the basis for a number of other modern tarot decks.[2]

The Wheel Of Fortune card, like other cards of the Major Arcana, varies widely in depiction between Tarot decks. Basically, this card has been modeled ever since the tarot's inception in the 15th century after the medieval concept of Rota Fortunae, the wheel of the goddess Fortuna. Images generally show a six- or eight-spoked wheel, often attended or crested by an individual (sometimes human; sometimes a Sphinx-like half-human) attired in an Egyptian-style headdress. In some decks, such as the AG Müller, the wheel is also attended by an individual wearing a blindfold; and often there are people sitting or riding on the wheel whilst others are shown falling from it.

The Wheel of Fortune was a common allegorical symbol in European iconography. The four figures shown either climb, are at the summit, or fall, or at the bottom of a revolving wheel presided over by personified Fortuna.

The wheel is not always shown inscribed with any lettering. However, where this is the case, the letters T-A-R-O (clockwise) or T-O-R-A (counter clockwise) can often be found aligned against four of the spokes, which can also be interpreted as R-O-T-A, the Latin word meaning "wheel". In some decks, such as the Waite, the wheel is also inscribed with additional alchemical symbols representing mercury, sulphur, salt (the three principals of Paracelsus's Tria Prima, which make up the human identity) and water.

On the Waite card shown, though not necessarily on others, there are also four winged creatures in the corners of the card, representing the symbols of the four Evangelists (The Lion, the Ox, the Man and the Eagle). These four Evengelists are also represented by the four fixed astrological signs: Leo, Taurus, Aquarius and Scorpio. In addition a representation of the god Anubis is seen rising with the wheel on the right side, while the snake-like Typhon descends on the left.

Interpretation

A common aspect to most interpretations of this card within a reading is to introduce an element of change in the querant's life, such change being in station, position or fortune: such as the rich becoming poor, or the poor becoming rich.[3][4][5]

Alternative Decks

In the Mythic Tarot deck, the Wheel of Fortune is depicted by the Fates.

References

  1. ^ Drury, Neville: The History of Magic in the Modern Age, Constable, 2000
  2. ^ Douglas, Alfred: The Tarot, Gollancz, 1972
  3. ^ Douglas, op cit
  4. ^ Reed, Ellen Cannon: The Witches Tarot, Llewellyn, 1989
  5. ^ Wood, Robin:The Robin Wood Tarot, Robin Wood Publishing, 1998

External links

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