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Yerkish

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Title: Yerkish  
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Subject: Great ape language, Animal communication, Animal language, List of writing systems, Panbanisha
Collection: 1971 Introductions, Animal Communication, Animal Rights, Constructed Languages
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Yerkish

Yerkish
Lexigram
Created by Ernst von Glasersfeld
Setting and usage Use a keyboard to punch keys with lexigrams
Users 3 (apes) (date missing)
Purpose
Language codes
ISO 639-3 None (mis)
Glottolog None

Yerkish is an artificial language developed for use by non-human primates. It employs a keyboard whose keys contain lexigrams, symbols corresponding to objects or ideas.[1]

A lexigram represents a word but is not necessarily indicative of the object referenced by the word. Lexigrams were notably used by the bonobos and chimpanzees. Researchers and primates were able to communicate using lexigram boards made in up to three panels with a total of 384 keys.[1][2]

Contents

  • History 1
  • See also 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4

History

Lexigram representing Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, a developer of the language

The language was developed by Robert M. Yerkes, the founder of the laboratory within which the lexigrams were first used.

The first ape trained to communicate in Yerkish was the chimpanzee Lana, beginning in 1973 within the context of the LANA project.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Interactive Lexigram, History of Ape Language, Great Ape Trust, 2010.
  2. ^ Jeffrey Kluger, "Inside the Minds of Animals", Time, August 5, 2010.

References

  1. Rumbaugh, D. M. ed. (1977) Language Learning by a Chimpanzee. The LANA Project. New York, Academic Press
  2. von Glasersfeld, E., Department of Psychology, University of Georgia. The Yerkish language for Non-Human Primates. American Journal of Computational Linguistics, 1974, 1.
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