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Mrs. Helen Jackson

By Higginson, Thomas Wentworth

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Book Id: WPLBN0000217855
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.5 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005
Full Text

Title: Mrs. Helen Jackson  
Author: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Writing.
Collections: Classic Literature Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: World Ebook Library

Citation

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Wentworth, 1823-191, H. T. (n.d.). Mrs. Helen Jackson. Retrieved from http://www.ebooklibrary.org/


Excerpt
IT is curious to see how promptly time begins to apply to the memory of remarkable persons, as to their tombstones, an effacing process that soon makes all inscriptions look alike. Already we see the beginnings of this tendency in regard to the late Mrs. Helen Jackson. The most brilliant, impetuous, and thoroughly individual woman of her time, — one whose very temperament seemed mingled of sunshine and fire, — she is already being portrayed simply as a conventional Sunday-school saint. It is undoubtedly true that she wrote her first poetry as a bereaved mother and her last prose as a zealous philanthropist; her life comprised both these phases, and she thoroughly accepted them; but it included so much more, it belonged to a personality so unique and in many respects so fascinating, that those who knew her best can by no means spare her for a commonplace canonization that takes the zest out of her memory. To describe her would be impossible except to the trained skill of some French novelist; and she would have been a sealed book to him, because no Frenchman could comprehend the curious thread of firm New England texture that ran through her whole being, tempering waywardness, keeping impulse from making shipwreck of itself, and leading her whole life to a high and concentrated purpose at last. And when we remember that she hated gossip about her own affairs, and was rarely willing to mention to reporters any fact about herself, except her birthday, — which she usually, with characteristic willfulness, put a year earlier than it was, — it is peculiarly hard to do for her now that work which she held in such aversion. No fame or publicity could ever make her seem, to those who knew her, anything but the most private and intimate of friends; and to write about her at all seems the betrayal of a confidence.

Table of Contents
· I. · II. · III. · IV. · THE LAST POEMS OF HELEN JACKSON (H. H.). · ACQUAINTED WITH GRIEF. · FEALTY. · VISION. · THE POET'S FORGE. · VANITY OF VANITIES. · HABEAS CORPUS. · A LAST PRAYER.

 

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