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Biotransformations of Bisphenol a in a Mammalian Model : Answers and New Questions Raised by Low-Dose Metabolic Fate Studies in Pregnant Cd1 Mice

By Soto, Ana M.

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Book Id: WPLBN0000228051
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 0.6 MB
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: Biotransformations of Bisphenol a in a Mammalian Model : Answers and New Questions Raised by Low-Dose Metabolic Fate Studies in Pregnant Cd1 Mice  
Author: Soto, Ana M.
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Government publications, United Nations., United Nations. Office for Disarmament Affairs
Collections: Government Library Collection, Disarmament Documents
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: United Nations- Office for Disarmament Affairs (Unoda)

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Soto, A. M. (n.d.). Biotransformations of Bisphenol a in a Mammalian Model : Answers and New Questions Raised by Low-Dose Metabolic Fate Studies in Pregnant Cd1 Mice. Retrieved from http://www.ebooklibrary.org/


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Government Reference Publication

Excerpt
Excerpt: We investigated the metabolic fate of a low dose (25 micrograms/kg) of bisphenol A [2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane] (BPA) injected subcutaneously in CD1 pregnant mice using a tritium-labeled molecule. Analytic methods were developed to allow a radio-chromatographic profiling of BPA residues in excreta and tissues, as well as in mothers reproductive tracts and fetuses, that contained more than 4% of the administered radioactivity. BPA was extensively metabolized by CD1 mice. Identified metabolite structures included the glucuronic acid conjugate of BPA, several double conjugates, and conjugated methoxylated compounds, demonstrating the formation of potentially reactive intermediates. Fetal radioactivity was associated with unchanged BPA, BPA glucuronide, and a disaccharide conjugate. The latter structure, as well as that of a dehydrated glucuronide conjugate of BPA (a major metabolite isolated from the digestive tract), showed that BPA metabolic routes were far more complex than previously thought. The estrogenicity of the metabolites that were identified but not tested for hormonal activity cannot be ruled out; however, in general, conjugated BPA metabolites have significantly lower potency than that of the parent compound. Thus, these data suggest the parental compound is responsible for the estrogenic effects observed in fetuses exposed to BPA during gestation in this mammalian model. Key words: biotransformation, bisphenol A, BPA, endocrine disruptors, environmental estrogen, fetus, gestation, metabolism, mouse, xenoestrogen. Environ Health Perspect 111:309?319 (2003). doi:10.1289/ehp.5603 [31 October 2002].

 

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