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Pure Stands of Temperate Forest Tree Species Modify Soil Respiration and N Turnover : Volume 2, Issue 2 (06/04/2005)

By Brüggemann, N.

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Book Id: WPLBN0003978728
Format Type: PDF Article :
File Size: Pages 29
Reproduction Date: 2015

Title: Pure Stands of Temperate Forest Tree Species Modify Soil Respiration and N Turnover : Volume 2, Issue 2 (06/04/2005)  
Author: Brüggemann, N.
Volume: Vol. 2, Issue 2
Language: English
Subject: Science, Biogeosciences, Discussions
Collections: Periodicals: Journal and Magazine Collection (Contemporary), Copernicus GmbH
Historic
Publication Date:
2005
Publisher: Copernicus Gmbh, Göttingen, Germany
Member Page: Copernicus Publications

Citation

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Papen, H., Pilegaard, K., Rosenkranz, P., Butterbach-Bahl, K., & Brüggemann, N. (2005). Pure Stands of Temperate Forest Tree Species Modify Soil Respiration and N Turnover : Volume 2, Issue 2 (06/04/2005). Retrieved from http://www.ebooklibrary.org/


Description
Description: Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmospheric Environmental Research (IMK-IFU), Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. The effects of five different tree species common in the temperate zone, i.e. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst), Japanese larch (Larix leptolepis [Sichold and Zucc.] Gordon) and mountain pine (Pinus mugo Turra), on soil respiration, gross N mineralization and gross nitrification rates were investigated. Soils were sampled in spring and summer 2002 at a forest trial in Western Jutland, Denmark, where pure stands of the five tree species of the same age were growing on the same soil. Soil respiration, gross rates of N mineralization and nitrification were significantly higher in the organic layers than in the Ah horizons for all tree species and both sampling dates. In summer (July), the highest rates of soil respiration, gross N mineralization and gross nitrification were found in the organic layer under spruce, followed by beech > larch > oak > pine. In spring (April), these rates were also higher under spruce compared to the other tree species, but were significantly lower than in summer. For the Ah horizons no clear seasonal trend was observed for any of the processes examined. A linear relationship between soil respiration and gross N mineralization (r2=0.77), gross N mineralization and gross nitrification rates (r2=0.72), and between soil respiration and gross nitrification (r2=0.81) was found. The results obtained underline the importance of considering the effect of forest type on soil C and N transformations.

Summary
Pure stands of temperate forest tree species modify soil respiration and N turnover

 

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